Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2

By: Peta Stavelli


Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2
Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2 Caravan review: Bailey Pursuit 400/2

The baby of the new Bailey Pursuit fleet is just a little over five metres in length, but its baby boomer target market is unlikely to find anything lacking.

The Pursuit series offers numerous layouts in caravans from 17-20 feet in length. All offer similar construction features familiar to Bailey fans, such as Alu-Tech construction; galvanised chassis; Alko anti-sway coupling; double-glazed windows and a grade-three heating and thermal insulation rating.

The latter feature, which is the mark of British-made recreational vehicles, will be of special interest to buyers looking for one suited to extended winter touring; especially when it's supported with the uber-efficiency of the installed Truma (dual fuel) Combi boiler.

But neither have summer tourers been overlooked. The Pursuit has loads of opening windows – all with insect screens as well as the usual blinds, and fully-closing (as opposed to merely decorative) curtains.

And so to bed. This was not a road test, so I will have to take as gospel the manufacturer's claim that the twin single settees are easily deployed on a smooth glide track to make a comfortable double, if preferred. However, I can attest to the cosy conviviality and practicality of this set up.

For me, there are two other highlights in this vehicle: the practical kitchen layout and the rear bathroom, which is generous in the extreme. The light-filled kitchen owes a great deal to the well-positioned Heki skylights – but cooking odours and steam will also be easily dispelled through the practical kitchen window, placed up above the sink and stovetop.

Bench-top space is limited in this cosy, but workable space. RV galleys are always something of a compromise, but in this instance, some of the preparation could be done on the bench-top opposite. Either way, the glass stove top and stainless sink with chopping board cover, will be mostly adequate.

Bailey _Pursuit _3

The spacious bathroom was a pleasant surprise. Not only is it light filled, but it manages to combine a good-sized basin, swivel cassette toilet and a very generous shower with an Ecocamel shower head. This was the first time I had come across this name or concept, although it may be I have not been paying sufficient attention to the water economy of such an installation which makes perfect sense.

And now to the nuts and bolts. I mentioned earlier the Alko Anti-sway Coupling. I'm such a fan of this recent technology which takes all the fear out of towing that I would not consider the purchase of a caravan which did not have it. This extra-ordinary development offers peace of mind for newbie towers, and also for seasoned travellers, because none of us is immune to the unexpected.

Being mindful of power savings, I cannot understand why LED lighting is not standard in all new RVs. It just makes sense. In this instance there are abundant LEDs throughout, as well 240V and 12V plugs; and the back-up security of a deep cycle battery. Thumbs up to the manufacturers for the installation of both carbon monoxide and smoke alarms, and also the smart new control panel.

Regular readers aware of prior problems associated with some British caravans will also appreciate the new bonding system, which marries bonded side and roof panels to the aluminium extrusion. Manufacturers claim this will offer increased strength to the lightweight vehicle, as well as protection against water ingress.

In summary, this is a cool wee caravan and I expect it will have broad appeal to the baby boomer market looking for a lighter, stronger, spacious, light-filled caravan that is compact and easy on the budget.

Thumbs up

  • Light-filled interior
  • Large bathroom
  • Opening windows

Thumbs down

  • Wardrobe in bathroom

Check out the full review in issue 123 of Motorhomes Caravans & Destinations. Subscribe here.

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